Men of Mischief | Psycho Bunny

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Eddie
Fortuna

6 min read

Since we opened our store in NorthPark Center, we’ve been discovering more and more of Dallas—and we’ve loved every aspect of the city.

After getting to know Eddie Fortuna, the self-proclaimed jack-of-all-trades juggling his passions for photography, the arts and style with his architectural career, we figured he’d be able to let us in on some of his favorite spots in the city, while also shedding light on what makes Dallas so special.

You live in Downtown Dallas, right?

We moved just last month, actually. But, yeah, until then we were living Downtown for 8 years. That was very much home. We talk about it a lot, my wife and I, about how that building and Downtown was home and will always be home to a degree. Now, we’re in Oak Cliff.

What makes Dallas so interesting to you from an architectural standpoint?

This goes beyond architecture, but I think that Dallas benefits from not being one of the five biggest cities in the country. It kind of plays second fiddle to New York and Los Angeles, and that, coupled with Texas hubris, gives Dallas an attitude that’s kind of like “look at us, we can do it too!”

That type of spirit fuels the architecture in Dallas, and the creative scene, whether it’s art or fashion or food. It’s almost like we’re that little brother that’s always trying to compete with the big brother and through that, what you get, in the architectural scene is: Dallas has beautiful historic buildings, and an Arts District that’s home to so many Pritzker Prize winning architects’ buildings.

There’s an opportunity and willingness in Dallas that drives things forward.

What makes Dallas special on a cultural front, to you?

It’s a tough one to nail down, because, again, it sounds silly, but it kind of boils down to Texas pride—anybody who’s been to Texas knows what I’m talking about. You have that, coupled with the pride that people have in any major city. Dallas has a really cosmopolitan feel relative to the rest of Texas—we’re not N.Y. or L.A., but the city does have a kind of glitzy feel to it that strays away from the stereotypical thoughts people have of Texas, and even major cities like Austin and Houston. We’re Texas at heart, but also different from what’s around us.

There’s an
opportunity and
willingness in Dallas
that drives things
forward.

There’s an opportunity and willingness in Dallas that drives things forward.

What are you favorite Dallas food spots?

I tend to gravitate towards taco spots here in Dallas. Being half-Mexican and growing up with that cuisine and, now, having it all around us here in Dallas.

It’s also a great conversation starter, you know, with anybody in Dallas: what’s your favorite taco spot?

I would say, I have two favorites: Revolver Taco Lounge and La Banqueta. They’re both very traditional; one, Revolver, is a little more refined, but still very authentic and the other, La Banqueta, is very, very authentic, with no frills, even a little gritty, but such a great taco. There are a ton of fine dining options in the city—great sushi, great Italian, great French— but, for me, I gravitate to those two taco spots.

Is there a place other than those two that you’ve turned to for take-out over the last few months?

We’ve been really mindful of patronizing restaurants that we loved and didn’t want to disappear over the last year. Revolver was probably at the top of the list, having been there more than anywhere else over the last year. There’s another restaurant, CBD Provisions, that’s remained open throughout all of this, which I think we’ve made an effort to support, too.

Is there a part of Dallas that you think is overlooked and not appreciated properly?

I’ve always felt that way about Downtown Dallas—as silly as that might sound. I think it often gets overlooked. There are so many different, distinct neighbourhoods in Dallas and they all have great things to offer, and I think, as a result, Downtown gets overlooked. Culturally, Downtown isn’t the hot spot like it is in other cities, but it still has a ton of stuff that people don’t take advantage of.

We’ve been really
mindful of patronizing
restaurants that we
loved and didn’t want to
disappear over the
last year.

We’ve been really mindful of patronizing restaurants that we loved and didn’t want to disappear over the last year.

Do you have a favorite coffee spot in Downtown Dallas?

Yes! When my wife and I were living Downtown, we’d go for a walk every morning on the weekends and grab coffee at Weekend Coffee in the Joule Hotel—it’s definitely our favorite spot.

What about the Dallas art scene, what’s the standout gallery or museum or neighborhood, that’s kind of emblematic of Dallas’s art scene?

I think the Arts District, itself. It’s on the edge of Downtown and is home to award-winning buildings and world-class museums. But, I think there’s a more grassroots level of an art scene that’s prevalent throughout the city. Deep Ellum has a lot of great galleries; the Design District is growing but still has an unpolished vibe, and is home to the Dallas Contemporary, which is still pretty grassroots in my opinion. I’d say beyond the Arts District, those two are probably contributing a lot to the art scene here in Dallas.

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