Men of Mischief | Psycho Bunny

Getting memes
down to a tee with

Adam.The.Creator

We’re taking over the world with the meme lord himself, one tee at a time. As soon as we met Adam, last year, we knew that he was one of the guys who gets us. And we get him—his hilarious creations keep us endlessly entertained. So, why not work together to bring the meme world into the real world?

We caught up with Adam in New York City to chat about our limited-edition collaboration, the thrill of making real things and why T-shirts are so important to him—and for personal style, in general.

You make memes on a daily basis, but you also make tangible products, right?

Yeah, I spend a lot of time building brands at BrandFire, my agency. At the end of that, there’s the making of physical products, putting them on shelves and seeing people touch them, pick them up—it’s thrilling. Plus, I like to sculpt and I’m getting involved in a gallery show. We’re thinking about different media—I might paint some of my memes to bring them to life.

You used the word thrilling. Why do you find making physical products so exciting? Is it because we’re in a world dominated by the online world—URL over IRL?

For me, I started my creative journey making tangible products. I’m 43 now—I’m not a digital baby—and when I started being a creative, there wasn’t Photoshop and Instagram, so my roots are in physical products. It’s thrilling and exciting because you’re transforming an idea into something real and tactile.

I actually used to work as a creative director at a T-shirt shop in Long Island in the ‘90s. I worked in the art department, but it was very close to where they’d do the printing, so I’d design them in my office then they’d come out a few meters away. I loved seeing the shirts come off the line; I loved the smell of it and picking them up off the press, when they were still hot. I’d get into mixing the colors. Being able to touch, and feel, and see, and smell my ideas—I got such a thrill out of seeing things come to life. It was extremely gratifying—being able to wear a T-shirt I designed and then seeing other people wear it. I feel the same way about these tees we’re making.

I actually used to work as a creative director at a T-shirt shop in Long Island in the ‘90s. I worked in the art department, but it was very close to where they’d do the printing, so I’d design them in my office then they’d come out a few meters away. I loved seeing the shirts come off the line; I loved the smell of it and picking them up off the press, when they were still hot. I’d get into mixing the colors. Being able to touch, and feel, and see, and smell my ideas—I got such a thrill out of seeing things come to life. It was extremely gratifying—being able to wear a T-shirt I designed and then seeing other people wear it. I feel the same way about these tees we’re making.

You make memes on a daily basis, but you also make tangible products, right?

Yeah, I spend a lot of time building brands at BrandFire, my agency. At the end of that, there’s the making of physical products, putting them on shelves and seeing people touch them, pick them up—it’s thrilling. Plus, I like to sculpt and I’m getting involved in a gallery show. We’re thinking about different media—I might paint some of my memes to bring them to life.

You used the word thrilling. Why do you find making physical products so exciting? Is it because we’re in a world dominated by the online world—URL over IRL?

For me, I started my creative journey making tangible products. I’m 43 now—I’m not a digital baby—and when I started being a creative, there wasn’t Photoshop and Instagram, so my roots are in physical products. It’s thrilling and exciting because you’re transforming an idea into something real and tactile.

I actually used to work as a creative director at a T-shirt shop in Long Island in the ‘90s. I worked in the art department, but it was very close to where they’d do the printing, so I’d design them in my office then they’d come out a few meters away. I loved seeing the shirts come off the line; I loved the smell of it and picking them up off the press, when they were still hot. I’d get into mixing the colors. Being able to touch, and feel, and see, and smell my ideas—I got such a thrill out of seeing things come to life. It was extremely gratifying—being able to wear a T-shirt I designed and then seeing other people wear it. I feel the same way about these tees we’re making.

Speaking of the collaboration — where does the design come from?

The concept was to bring the meme world into physical form, which ties into what we were just talking about. I had a few ideas in mind—you know, the cheating boyfriend looking over his shoulder and stuff like that—but the king of all memes, in my estimation, is Salt Bae. I wanted to go with something iconic and timeless. If you had to represent meme culture with a single meme, it would be that image of a guy sprinkling salt—anybody who understood memes even marginally knew that meme and it really took the world by storm. There’s an element of nostalgia, too—like the greatest meme that ever was.

But I also just like the idea of this character sprinkling carrots, I’ve riffed on it before, with various people sprinkling different things, but there’s something fun and cartoony with the bunny doing it. It’s accessible, it’s relatable, it’s nostalgic—everybody gets it. It’s novel and fun and really symbolizes meme culture in a physical form.

What do you think the appeal of T-shirts is? Like—why choose the T-shirt as medium to bring the meme world into real life?

Well, for one—I love T-shirts and collect them. You have your favorite ones that you love, whether it’s from a musician or an artist collaboration or from a brand. It becomes this perfect expression of who you are and what you like and how you feel. It’s kind of the meme-equivalent of an article of clothing: It’s not necessarily a heavy investment and becomes accessible to everybody. Anybody can make a meme or consume a meme, just like anybody can make a T-shirt or wear one.

So it’s super accessible, but, at the same time, you can elevate it. You can wear a T-shirt with a blazer, or under a nice hoodie. You can dress it up, you can make it a staple of your wardrobe, you can wear it when you’re just hanging out. It’s the most versatile and accessible piece of clothing.

But I really think it comes back to expressiveness. That’s what people are tapping into when they wear a bright tee or a graphic tee—they’re showing people how they feel and what they’re into. A T-shirt strikes the perfect balance between culture and art and accessibility.

Speaking of the collaboration — where does the design come from?

The concept was to bring the meme world into physical form, which ties into what we were just talking about. I had a few ideas in mind—you know, the cheating boyfriend looking over his shoulder and stuff like that—but the king of all memes, in my estimation, is Salt Bae. I wanted to go with something iconic and timeless. If you had to represent meme culture with a single meme, it would be that image of a guy sprinkling salt—anybody who understood memes even marginally knew that meme and it really took the world by storm. There’s an element of nostalgia, too—like the greatest meme that ever was.

But I also just like the idea of this character sprinkling carrots, I’ve riffed on it before, with various people sprinkling different things, but there’s something fun and cartoony with the bunny doing it. It’s accessible, it’s relatable, it’s nostalgic—everybody gets it. It’s novel and fun and really symbolizes meme culture in a physical form.

What do you think the appeal of T-shirts is? Like—why choose the T-shirt as medium to bring the meme world into real life?

Well, for one—I love T-shirts and collect them. You have your favorite ones that you love, whether it’s from a musician or an artist collaboration or from a brand. It becomes this perfect expression of who you are and what you like and how you feel. It’s kind of the meme-equivalent of an article of clothing: It’s not necessarily a heavy investment and becomes accessible to everybody. Anybody can make a meme or consume a meme, just like anybody can make a T-shirt or wear one.

So it’s super accessible, but, at the same time, you can elevate it. You can wear a T-shirt with a blazer, or under a nice hoodie. You can dress it up, you can make it a staple of your wardrobe, you can wear it when you’re just hanging out. It’s the most versatile and accessible piece of clothing.

But I really think it comes back to expressiveness. That’s what people are tapping into when they wear a bright tee or a graphic tee—they’re showing people how they feel and what they’re into. A T-shirt strikes the perfect balance between culture and art and accessibility.

Do you have a memory from growing up, when you realized that a tee was more than just a piece of clothing? That it was your favorite T-shirt and that wearing it actually meant something.

This is absolutely wild. I feel like I’m in a trance. As soon as you brought that up, three shirts popped into my mind that I haven’t thought about in, like, twenty years. But they’re vivid memories.

I had this Freddy Krueger T-shirt when I was about thirteen. It was black and had the character on the front holding the glove up, but it was mostly face—you know, with that classic expression. I remember it was really well-printed. And I remember thinking it was so sick. At the time, in the ‘80s, horror culture was definitely a thing. It made me feel so cool; even as a young kid, I felt so edgy wearing it. I wore it so much—these tees I’m talking about, all of them, really—that the ink started to crack and the black faded to charcoal from being washed so much, but I’d still wear it.

Before that, there was a Dennis Rodman tee, from when he was on the Pistons and it said “Dennis ‘The Worm’ Rodman” and there was an action shot in black and white behind the ettering. I remember the Pistons colors were a bit off from what they normally are. The red was a bit pink and the blue was a bit poppier, but it was so nicely printed.

There was also a sublimated David Robinson tank top. It was so well done and had these great colors on it that really popped. It was really bright. I loved that. And, I remember a Beastie Boys tee—a white tee, with a photo of them sitting on a curb, with green lettering. I loved that shirt.

You weren’t kidding about these still being vivid memories so many years later. Those T-shirts kind of become part of who you are, no?

It’s so funny that thinking back to my youth and teenaged years—I was expressing myself through tees. I can remember the feeling of putting on my a favorite tee once it was out of the wash. It was like putting on a personality. I’d match it with caps I was wearing, too. I guess I figured that anybody who saw me would know I was a fan—like a conversation-starter.

It’s like a universal handshake when you see someone wearing a tee you’re down with.

Exactly!

I’ve done that recently, go up to someone and just be like “I like that tee, it’s sick, man.” If I see someone with a clever shirt, or a reference to a character or a band, or anything that I like, really, I give them a little knowing nod to let them know.

Keep up with Adam here:

@adam.the.creator